Posts by: Hayley Malouin

The November Ticket: there’s something gloomily appropriate about the title the Theatre Centre has given its mini-season, co-presented with Why Not Theatre, surface/underground, and Butcher’s Block Collective. Seeing the season’s three plays is a thoroughly sobering experience, as chilly and raw as the skin on my face…

Nick and Hayley’s open dialogue about Annable Soutar’s newest play The Watershed continues. For those of you who are behind, you can read part one here. Here is Hayley’s response to Nick’s letter. Hi Nick, Thanks for your letter. I like what you have to say about The Watershed’s narrative structure and I agree: what ma…

If you hate having fun, don’t go see Much Ado About Nothing by Make Art Theatre at the Hamilton Fringe Festival. This show is stuffed with good times, including villainous capes, ‘50s style greasers, and a really funny bit with some popcorn (spoiler: it ends up all over the floor). A condensed and updated version of Sh…

Advertising versus “humane marketing;” head versus heart; the big city versus the smaller city. Commercials for Hamilton, what are you selling? On the surface Commercials – written and directed by Sky Gilbert – appears to be about two advertising employees (well, one employee and one intern) going head to head about th…

Walking out of the theatre after seeing Air at the Hamilton Fringe, I hear a woman say “Incredible. It’s just him up there!” While she’s technically correct, and means this as high praise, I have to disagree. True: actor and artistic director of Tottering Biped Theatre Trevor Copp performs solo, with no props or set pi…

Three years ago, my friend and occasional director Keavy Lynch, artistic director at Empty Box Theatre Company, texted me saying she needed actors for a directing class assignment, and that she had “dibsed” me. That was my first encounter with the world of Waiting For Alonzo and my character, Bielke. It was a different…

“It’s a fine line between tantalizing and torture”. Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play dances maniacally along this fine line, giving audiences a chance to see what the scraps of our collective cultural phenomena will become. Separated into three acts, Mr. Burns is fragmented and futuristic, an homage to its source materi…

The work of a theatre company with its finger on the pulse of a city, such as Suitcase In Point, is never done. The tents of The Hub have barely been packed away, and they are already hard at work planning next year’s festival. Nick met up with Annie Wilson (read our other interview with her here) and Deanna Jones to c…

The theatres are empty, the tents are down, and the bars are swept. In The Soil has come a close after another packed weekend of music, theatre, and visual art. Here’s what our four Dartcritics had to say about the festival. Hayley Malouin writes:  The name In The Soil is important. It implies that the artistry and cre…

One of the most interesting things about In The Soil is its dedication to local art and artists. So strong is this dedication that they were happy to host the end of a much longer run of Stolen Theatre Collective’s production of The Dumb Waiter. The show Premiered April 10 at the Courthouse Theatre, and has already cre…